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Kauai Farming Classes To Be Held At Kauai Community College

It seems so simple: put some seeds in the ground, water them, harvest the results. But anyone who’s experienced the joys and frustrations of growing a vegetable garden knows how thoroughly complex it can be.  Multiply that by 10, or a hundred, and you’ve got the life of a farmer.

So, we are very thankful for people like Glen Hontz. Glen is going to be launching a 15 week Organic Gardening and Farming training program on March 4, at the Kauai Community College, meeting for 5 hours every Thursday till June.

Graduates will acquire “the basic skills and knowledge needed for a successful start in small scale food production operations at home sites and community gardens.” Then Kauai will have more locally-produced food.

If you’re interested, call 245-8318, or you can call Glenn directly at 246-4859. Tuition is $180; tuition assistance is available.

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Justin - Head Web Head

March 1, 2010

What a great class for Kauai. We can definitely use more locally grown food.

Sagar, do you think it’s possible to have local food be competitively priced with imported food?

Justin - Head Web Head

March 1, 2010

What a great class for Kauai. We can definitely use more locally grown food.

Sagar, do you think it’s possible to have local food be competitively priced with imported food?

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Sagar Hallal, RA

March 1, 2010

Justin, it’s already happening on a small scale; on a large scale, it’s going to be possible to be competitive in the not-too-distant future. Energy costs (transportation) will continue to rise, and the dollar will likely continue to drop in relation to the currencies of countries that are currently exporting cheap food (labor).

At the same time, as the infrastructure to produce local food gains sophistication, prices will drop. The biggest wild card is whether cheap farm land will become increasingly available, through government intervention or the auspices of the large local landowners.

And THAT will happen when it becomes obvious that it’s in everybody’s best interest to do so.

Sagar Hallal, RA

March 1, 2010

Justin, it’s already happening on a small scale; on a large scale, it’s going to be possible to be competitive in the not-too-distant future. Energy costs (transportation) will continue to rise, and the dollar will likely continue to drop in relation to the currencies of countries that are currently exporting cheap food (labor).

At the same time, as the infrastructure to produce local food gains sophistication, prices will drop. The biggest wild card is whether cheap farm land will become increasingly available, through government intervention or the auspices of the large local landowners.

And THAT will happen when it becomes obvious that it’s in everybody’s best interest to do so.

Keahi Pelayo

March 3, 2010

Looks great. The more self reliant we can be the better.
Aloha,
Keahi

Keahi Pelayo

March 3, 2010

Looks great. The more self reliant we can be the better.
Aloha,
Keahi

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