COVID19 UPDATE
Kauai

From Early Plantation Days Until Today Hawaiian Pineapple is Still an Island Favorite

Hawaiian pineapple is a delicious, versatile fruit than can be eaten raw, sauteed, or baked. Unlike bananas, oranges, or grapes, fresh pineapples cannot be used with gelatin mixtures as pineapple contains an enzyme that breaks down the proteins in gelatin.

When in Kauai, the Hawaiian pineapple is an obvious favorite at local Sunshine Farmer’s Markets

Farmer’s Market Location and Day/Time:

  • Koloa—Koloa Ball Park (Knudsen) Maluhia Road, Monday 12:00 p.m.
  • Kalaheo—Kalaheo Neighborhood Center Papalina Road off Kaumualii, Tuesday 3:00 p.m.
  • Kapaa—Kapaa New Town Park Kahau Street, Wednesday 3:00 p.m.
  • Hanapepe—Hanapepe Park, Thursday 3:00 p.m.
  • Kilauea—Kilauea Neighborhood Ctr. Keneke off Lighthouse Rd., Thursday 4:30 p.m.
  • Lihue—Vidinha Stadium, Hoolako Road, Friday 3:00 p.m.
  • Kekaha—Kekaha Neighborhood Center Elepaio Road, Saturday 9:00 p.m.

The Pineapple

There are basically five different kinds of pineapple (not all grown in Hawaii). The Kona Sugarloaf, the Natal Queen, the Perambuco, the Red Spanish, and the Smooth Cayenne.

The most common variety grown in Hawaii is the Smooth Cayenne. It is around 5-6 lbs. with pale yellow to yellow flesh. It is cylindrical in shape, and has a high sugar and acid content. This variety is well adapted to canning and processing, and is the most easily obtainable in U.S. grocery stores.

Today, Hawaii has a new popular variant of the Smooth Cayenne, called the Hilo. This is a compact 2-3 lb. Hawaiian variant of the Smooth Cayenne. The fruit is smaller, paler, and sweeter with less acid. These low acid, sweet pineapples are very popular on Kauai. Pineapple is used as garnishes for tropical drinks, in fruit salads, in baked goods, and even in chutneys.

Here is a recipe for pineapple:

Fiery Pineapple Chutney Recipe from “The Fields of Greens Cookbook”

Prep Time: 15 minutes total, Time: 50 minutes, Yield: 2 cups

About This Recipe: “Part of the pineapple is pureed to make it into a sweet tart syrup, then cooked with chunks of pineapple, cayenne, and black pepper to add a nice kick of heat.”

  • 1 large pineapple
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1-2 jalapeno chilies, seeded, finely diced (or use Serranos for more heat)
  • 1/4 med red onions, finely diced (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh mint chopped

DIRECTIONS

Peel and core pineapple, cut into small pieces. Puree 2 cups of it and set the rest aside. Combine the puree, sugar, spices, ginger, salt, and lemon juice in a medium saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, then cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring as needed, to make a pineapple syrup. Add the pineapple chunks, chilies, and red onion; reduce the heat a little and cook over medium low heat for 25 minutes.

The puree and the pineapple chunks will blend together with the chunks retaining some of their texture. Move the chutney to a bowl and let it sit for 1-2 hours before serving. It will keep for at least a week in the refrigerator, but don’t add the mint until you’re ready to serve. Enjoy!

Additional Information

While we are talking about the beautiful island of Kauai, and pineapples, be sure to check out our fabulous one-of-a kind “Pineapple House” a fully remodeled, charming plantation home.

It is walking distance to both the beach and Wailua River, minutes from the airport, and across the street from the famous old Coco Palms Hotel. This home (MLS# 244137) awaits you and your family, and is also registered as a legal vacation rental home. It’s here just waiting for you to enjoy. Additional information.

Contact Ilona at (808) 635-1495, or Lucy at (808) 651-5676 for more information on The Pineapple House. We are ready to assist you with your Kauai real estate needs.

Comments (12) Show CommentsHide Comments (Remember)

Cool. Add your comment...

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Leave your opinion here. Please be nice. Your Email address will be kept private, this form is secure and we never spam you.

Ilona Coffey

April 25, 2011

Oh what a great recipe, I will definately try this and love the Pineapple House, who would ever want to sell that darling house?

Ilona Coffey

April 25, 2011

Oh what a great recipe, I will definately try this and love the Pineapple House, who would ever want to sell that darling house?

Gary Siracusa

April 25, 2011

I like to grill pineapple – 1/4″ thick slices basted with a shoyu/brown sugar/ginger glaze compliments any meal cooked on the grill! If you have a pineapple corer (not very expensive) it simplifies the prep immensely … and the shell can be used for a tropical salad presentation.

Speaking of winners … the pineapple house is just that and not very expensive either for the quality of your investment!

Gary Siracusa

April 25, 2011

I like to grill pineapple – 1/4″ thick slices basted with a shoyu/brown sugar/ginger glaze compliments any meal cooked on the grill! If you have a pineapple corer (not very expensive) it simplifies the prep immensely … and the shell can be used for a tropical salad presentation.

Speaking of winners … the pineapple house is just that and not very expensive either for the quality of your investment!

Organic Raw Hawaiian

April 25, 2011

[…] From Early Plantation Days Until Today Hawaiian Pineapple is Still … Hawaiian pineapple is a delicious, versatile fruit than can be eaten raw sauteed, or baked. Unlike bananas, oranges, or grapes, fresh pineapples cannot be used with gelatin mixtures as pineapple contains an enzyme that breaks down the . […]

Organic Raw Hawaiian

April 25, 2011

[…] From Early Plantation Days Until Today Hawaiian Pineapple is Still … Hawaiian pineapple is a delicious, versatile fruit than can be eaten raw sauteed, or baked. Unlike bananas, oranges, or grapes, fresh pineapples cannot be used with gelatin mixtures as pineapple contains an enzyme that breaks down the . […]

Laura

April 26, 2011

I can’t wait to try out the recipe! Thanks for all your research, that was really useful information. 🙂

Laura

April 26, 2011

I can’t wait to try out the recipe! Thanks for all your research, that was really useful information. 🙂

Katie Minkus, R(BIC)

April 27, 2011

Aloha, Lucy… which one is the white pineapple? That’s my favorite… I have to giggle because visitors who have never seen a pineapple growing in nature before always exclaim about how “cute” a pineapple looks – just happened last weekend with a visitor from Vermont. She’d never seen a pineapple plant before, and to her credit, admittedly, it was really “cute!”

Katie Minkus, R(BIC)

April 27, 2011

Aloha, Lucy… which one is the white pineapple? That’s my favorite… I have to giggle because visitors who have never seen a pineapple growing in nature before always exclaim about how “cute” a pineapple looks – just happened last weekend with a visitor from Vermont. She’d never seen a pineapple plant before, and to her credit, admittedly, it was really “cute!”

Lucy Adams, RS

June 13, 2011

On Kauai, the small, sweet juicy pineapple is called a “sugarloaf” and it’s meat is lighter in color–closer to white. But don’t let the color fool you, it is absolutely delicious!

Lucy Adams, RS

June 13, 2011

On Kauai, the small, sweet juicy pineapple is called a “sugarloaf” and it’s meat is lighter in color–closer to white. But don’t let the color fool you, it is absolutely delicious!

More Articles from Hawaii Life