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Restoration & Redevelopment in Hale’iwa Town – 7 Key Projects

Hale’iwa is known for its country, plantation, small-town feel, and is notorious for its shave ice and surf town vibe. We are all anxious for the new Hale’iwa store lots that are coming to an end in construction, bringing new light to our community, shopping, employment, places to eat, and maybe some nightlife, too.

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New Hale’iwa store lots are coming to an end in construction

This new development is part of Kamehameha School’s “North Shore Sustainable Community Plan.” It’s great because, throughout the planning process, they worked with the North Shore community to maintain the town characteristics, yet honored the values of O’ahu’s northern community. The substantial community involvement throughout the planning process, beginning back in July 2006, really makes our Hale’iwa town even more close-knit.

Many group community liaison meetings included business owners, farmers, conservationists, native Hawaiians, Real Estate professionals, neighboring residents, and others addressing concerns and the future for the North Shore. After numerous small, intimate meetings as well as large ones, with over 40 members from the local community, mail-out surveys, interviews, youth forums (held at Waialua High School), and North Shore neighborhood board meetings, the plan was finally presented. It consists of 7 projects.

Key Project #1: ‘Aina Ulu Projection: Loko Ea Fishpond Restoration

Loko Ea is a sustainable fishpond with a long, rich history. The end goal of this project is to restore the site to a functioning fishpond, managed by the local community, educating and also providing food for people in the area. Community work days for the Loko Ea Fishpond restoration are held the third Saturday of each month.

Loko Ea Fishpond

Key Project #2: Agricultural Water Improvements

The focus of this project is to increase and promote water reliability by improving infrastructure and old irrigation systems in order to decrease losses, such as evaporation and or ground seepage. Also, by supplementing surface waters with ground water.

Key Project #3: Alternative Energy Development (Wind & Solar)

This project consists of testing several forms of natural energy production that seem favorable for North Shore lands: wind power, solar energy production, and in-line hydropower.

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Key Project #4: Matsumoto Redevelopment

Matsumoto Shave Ice is famous and part of the historic Hale’iwa area. Ultimately, the goal here is to provide a safe set back from the street for visitors and pedestrians, while keeping improvements inline with the plantation feel of the town.

Key Project #5: Town Center Commercial Development

Most of us are already aware that Hale’iwa is notorious for its shave ice, art gallery, boutique, surf shop, and restaurants. This project is creating a place for residents and visitors to gather and shop at more full-service establishments, which the town currently lacks, forcing us to frequently travel to Wahiawa and Mililani. These commercial elements of this project will focus on providing these basic services to local residents at lower prices and less limited store hours, ultimately giving Hale’iwa an appreciable sense of community.

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Key Project #6: Hale’iwa Residential Village & Outlying Residential Development

The primary goal for this project is to accommodate existing North Shore families with a range of affordable housing options (approx. 125 condominium/apartments, 150 townhomes, and 75 single-family homes), while staying within the core area of Hale’iwa, giving some preference to local residents when offering the units for sale with hopes of alleviating overcrowding in existing single-family homes.

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Catalyst Project #7: Sustainability Institute

Kamehameha School’s North Shore lands offer up the perfect opportunity to show real life sustainability examples of the land, water, and community. This institute would uphold traditional Hawaiian culture values and knowledge cohesive with modern-day science, encompassing research projects, educational programs, working pilot programs, and business ventures on North Shore lands.

Want to Stay Informed?

This is just a brief overview of what the future of Hale’iwa has in store, and some of the great reasons why I’m happy to reside here. Keep in tune with what’s going on in Haleiwa, and its progress – it’s essential when considering the opportunity to buy or sell North Shore real estate. For more information, feel free to contact me.

Aloha!

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Heidi White

November 4, 2014

Chad, great information! You sure capture how connected and caring the North Shore community is to all its rich and diverse population and history. I am anxious to see these projects unfold. What a beautiful part of the island and a great community!

Heidi White

November 4, 2014

Chad, great information! You sure capture how connected and caring the North Shore community is to all its rich and diverse population and history. I am anxious to see these projects unfold. What a beautiful part of the island and a great community!

Tracy Stice

November 15, 2014

Chad,

Way to pull it together with your blog! I learned a lot and it is great to see how Kamehameha Schools has involved the whole community in the project. This certainly is a lot different than what we experience in most of the state where a developer will bring a totally untested , un-vetted project to to market without involving enough input from the community. I am watching Kahului on Maui turning in to a giant box store wart on the face of the first thing visitors see when they get off the airplane . How many more Walmarts, kMarts, Targets, and Costco’s do we need?

It appears that the Haleiwa venture offers something for everybody and hopefully it was work out for the retail side for those taking the risks to provide local provisions to the community.

Chadwick Peebles

November 17, 2014

Thanks Tracy,

I’m glad you enjoyed the blog. Haleiwa is a rare community and we are thankful everyone works hard to keep it’s country vibe. It will be great to see what else is in store. I enjoy Maui too & look forward to vacationing there soon in the future. I had prior commitments this year, but hopefully we will make it to the next Maui camp out, that sounded like a great time!

Aloha,

Chad

Tracy Stice

November 15, 2014

Chad,

Way to pull it together with your blog! I learned a lot and it is great to see how Kamehameha Schools has involved the whole community in the project. This certainly is a lot different than what we experience in most of the state where a developer will bring a totally untested , un-vetted project to to market without involving enough input from the community. I am watching Kahului on Maui turning in to a giant box store wart on the face of the first thing visitors see when they get off the airplane . How many more Walmarts, kMarts, Targets, and Costco’s do we need?

It appears that the Haleiwa venture offers something for everybody and hopefully it was work out for the retail side for those taking the risks to provide local provisions to the community.

Chadwick Peebles

November 17, 2014

Thanks Tracy,

I’m glad you enjoyed the blog. Haleiwa is a rare community and we are thankful everyone works hard to keep it’s country vibe. It will be great to see what else is in store. I enjoy Maui too & look forward to vacationing there soon in the future. I had prior commitments this year, but hopefully we will make it to the next Maui camp out, that sounded like a great time!

Aloha,

Chad

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