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Kauai

47 Acre Common Ground Kauai Land with Multiple Dwellings

This is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to live, work, and farm an amazing piece of paradise on the north shore of Kaua’i. Part of what had originally been the 600 acre Guava Kai Plantation, today Common Ground Kaua’i is a 47 acre piece of land that’s home to organic gardens, a “farm to table” café, and a “permaculture” touring environment.

Lot 28 Kalihiwai, Kilauea (MLS# 266287)

Live. Work. Farm.

The island of Kauai imports roughly 90 percent of its food from the U.S. mainland, making Common Ground an incredibly appealing alternative for residents and visitors wanting truly local food. What the farm doesn’t produce – meat, dairy, fish, sugar, coffee, etc. – it sources from other small-scale growers and ranches in the area.

Five agriculturally zoned residences can be built on the grounds. There are numerous warehouse and living structures with beautiful gardens and hiking trails throughout.

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Debbie Smith

May 11, 2014

Please send listing price……..also if the owner is interested in ag trade in California. We have an apple ranch near Avila Beach, Calif. with cider press and sales barn in beautiful See Canyon. Our business is Gopher Glen Apple Farm. also has web site. We have also Avila Valley Barn and busy in farming at both places. We just listed the apple farm. Please get back with us at the email address given. Thank you, Debbie Smith

Debbie Smith

May 11, 2014

Please send listing price……..also if the owner is interested in ag trade in California. We have an apple ranch near Avila Beach, Calif. with cider press and sales barn in beautiful See Canyon. Our business is Gopher Glen Apple Farm. also has web site. We have also Avila Valley Barn and busy in farming at both places. We just listed the apple farm. Please get back with us at the email address given. Thank you, Debbie Smith

Dawn Lipski

July 8, 2014

What is the listing price, and what exactly do they produce? Is it mainly fruit and vegetables? “What the farm doesn’t produce – meat, dairy, fish, sugar, coffee, etc.”

Dawn Lipski

July 8, 2014

What is the listing price, and what exactly do they produce? Is it mainly fruit and vegetables? “What the farm doesn’t produce – meat, dairy, fish, sugar, coffee, etc.”

anita

December 24, 2014

what is the listing price? Is the land fee simple or bishops estate?

anita

December 24, 2014

what is the listing price? Is the land fee simple or bishops estate?

anita

December 24, 2014

Is this land fee simple or bishops estate?

anita

December 24, 2014

Is this land fee simple or bishops estate?

Nicole Scott

May 15, 2015

Nice Bio, Neal! Given your passion to give back, I’m sure you can appreciate what I have to say about this property. The land described in this blog seems like the kind of place that should be a land trust. Either that, or a tenants in common Intentional Community sort of establishment, but one that’s not based on ownership at all. It’s hard for cultures to grasp this fundamental change in how to live on land, but it’s really necessary if we are to shift from the unnaturally profit driven societies we find ourselves stuck in today.

The cost to purchase something like this is probably in the millions which a lot of amazing people who could beautify that land could not afford. Those that can afford it, will more than likely keep mowing all that lawn which is a waste of time and resources, in my humble opinion. On an environmental front, certainly there should be far more food than lawns and indigenous plant life to support/sustain local fauna on those grounds than what is there presently.

If only there was a way to resolve the debt paradigm (the whole borrow from for profit bankers to live anywhere) and have philanthropists and angel investors invest in something like this as a non-profit to give back to the people and the world in posterity. Bring in passionate people from all walks of life that have something to offer the land which will in turn offer back. People ranging in skill sets from Landscape designers, arborists, native plant specialists, botanists, naturalists, and the like to engineers, alternative energy specialists, and the like, to sculpturists, artists, healers, shamans, etc.

This property could very well become an example of what can be sustained at the maximum benefit of all. A property which holds principles higher than profit. Producing a foundation as a flagship operation that teaches communities how to coexist with the land in greater harmony with the natural world. Using the most advanced and groundbreaking tech donated by all the innovators of our day and age.

Those grounds could be beautified beyond belief! Like a jungle forest, but filled with food bearing plants in a more wild design, supporting heirloom varietals, endangered plant species, and more. It could become world renowned. Like a botanical dream that turns the whole idea of monoculture farming on it’s head. The possibilities for this place would go much farther if the way the land was cared for was open to all wanting to learn how to build permaculture and at the same time, transforming the grounds into an oasis of varietals and a robust self-sufficiency system. Not as some lunatic fringe sort of commune thing, but one that would appeal to the sensibilities of even the highest of snobbery. I’m sure you can see where I’m going with this. Perhaps those with the means will find a way. Until then, I can only share my own visionary idealism (which I’m sure is shared by many) and hope that perhaps what I say might inspire the right people to co-create such a reality in earnest. If that ever happens, I’d love to be invited to be a part of it without having to owe banks to do it.

Nicole Scott

May 15, 2015

Nice Bio, Neal! Given your passion to give back, I’m sure you can appreciate what I have to say about this property. The land described in this blog seems like the kind of place that should be a land trust. Either that, or a tenants in common Intentional Community sort of establishment, but one that’s not based on ownership at all. It’s hard for cultures to grasp this fundamental change in how to live on land, but it’s really necessary if we are to shift from the unnaturally profit driven societies we find ourselves stuck in today.

The cost to purchase something like this is probably in the millions which a lot of amazing people who could beautify that land could not afford. Those that can afford it, will more than likely keep mowing all that lawn which is a waste of time and resources, in my humble opinion. On an environmental front, certainly there should be far more food than lawns and indigenous plant life to support/sustain local fauna on those grounds than what is there presently.

If only there was a way to resolve the debt paradigm (the whole borrow from for profit bankers to live anywhere) and have philanthropists and angel investors invest in something like this as a non-profit to give back to the people and the world in posterity. Bring in passionate people from all walks of life that have something to offer the land which will in turn offer back. People ranging in skill sets from Landscape designers, arborists, native plant specialists, botanists, naturalists, and the like to engineers, alternative energy specialists, and the like, to sculpturists, artists, healers, shamans, etc.

This property could very well become an example of what can be sustained at the maximum benefit of all. A property which holds principles higher than profit. Producing a foundation as a flagship operation that teaches communities how to coexist with the land in greater harmony with the natural world. Using the most advanced and groundbreaking tech donated by all the innovators of our day and age.

Those grounds could be beautified beyond belief! Like a jungle forest, but filled with food bearing plants in a more wild design, supporting heirloom varietals, endangered plant species, and more. It could become world renowned. Like a botanical dream that turns the whole idea of monoculture farming on it’s head. The possibilities for this place would go much farther if the way the land was cared for was open to all wanting to learn how to build permaculture and at the same time, transforming the grounds into an oasis of varietals and a robust self-sufficiency system. Not as some lunatic fringe sort of commune thing, but one that would appeal to the sensibilities of even the highest of snobbery. I’m sure you can see where I’m going with this. Perhaps those with the means will find a way. Until then, I can only share my own visionary idealism (which I’m sure is shared by many) and hope that perhaps what I say might inspire the right people to co-create such a reality in earnest. If that ever happens, I’d love to be invited to be a part of it without having to owe banks to do it.

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